THE LONDON DIARIES


VOL.6

Miyelle. Ceramics

THE LONDON

DIARIES


VOL.6

Miyelle. Ceramics

Spotlight on:

MIYELLE KARMI


Meet Miyelle, a self-taught ceramist, who started creating with clay in 2017. Having been a graphic designer and art director Miyelle was looking for a creative outlet away from the computer screen. Joining the studio Turning Earth as soon as she touched the clay, she fell in love!





Photographer: Nicole M Gomes @nicolemgomes

Spotlight on:

Miyelle Karmi


Meet Miyelle, a self-taught ceramist, who started creating with clay in 2017.  Having been a graphic designer and art director Miyelle was looking for a creative outlet away from the computer screen. Joining the studio Turning Earth as soon as she touched the clay, she fell in love!


Photographer: Nicole M Gomes @nicolemgomes


Q&A

How was Hackney Hooker born?

I was first taught how to make a granny square at a seniors coffee morning I volunteered at years ago, that’s the actual origin I suppose. But it was only in the last couple of years that I started making stuff for more than just immediate family and friends. TikTok coming along and making crochet popular again deffo played a part, and then it naturally evolved from there with people reaching out for bits I’d been sharing first on my personal insta and then on the Hackney Hooker one.

Where did the name come from? 

It was a joke, I had a craft club at my flat every Monday night - everyone brought their own thing, painting, crochet, knitting, sewing, very East London - and one of the girls was laughing at the concept of stitch and bitch because she’d never heard it before. Then I threw out the idea of being called The Hackney Hooker, and it just stuck, there was no other name I could use after that, it still makes me laugh. 

What do you take into consideration when

selecting  your yarns?

Ultimately, it’s about what the product is being used for, how breathable it needs to be, how sturdy, how malleable etc, and that largely dictates my choices.


Like most things handmade, it’s tough when you try to be more mindful of the materials you use, as this often comes at a cost, and when people can buy a crochet dress on ASOS for £15 or less... it’s hard convincing people to spend that on raw materials alone.


What’s next in the pipeline? 

Project wise? So many things! I’m getting married in a couple of months which has absolutely inspired me to put together some playful bridal pieces.

I’m working to get stocked in a local shop which is mad and fab in equal measure.

In terms of dreaming big, I’d love to collaborate with some of my favourite brands or host some fun event in one of the many wine bars around this way. 

Tell us about the ALIGNE pieces you’re wearing and how you’ve styled them?

I like clothing items that are fuss free, so I chose pieces that I feel are chic, are easy, are versatile. Then I can inject some more playfulness with the accessories if I want.


There are some days I love getting ready, and others where I just need to thrown on a uniform without thinking. Incorporating pieces like these into my wardrobe means no matter how I wake up feeling, I’m able to feign a bit of effort.


Where do you go for outfit inspiration?

People on the street, social media also plays a part, consciously or unconsciously. 


What's your approach to curating a wardrobe? 

Slow and steady. I used to be way more impulsive, but I feel like it’s only now I’m in my late 20s that I actually get what I like in a way that lasts beyond a season.


I also love second hand/consignment shopping, so living East means I’m spoiled for choice.


How was Hackney Hooker born?

I was first taught how to make a granny square at a seniors coffee morning I volunteered at years ago, that’s the actual origin I suppose. But it was only in the last couple of years that I started making stuff for more than just immediate family and friends. TikTok coming along and making crochet popular again deffo played a part, and then it naturally evolved from there with people reaching out for bits I’d been sharing first on my personal insta and then on the Hackney Hooker one.

Where did the name come from? 

It was a joke, I had a craft club at my flat every Monday night - everyone brought their own thing, painting, crochet, knitting, sewing, very East London - and one of the girls was laughing at the concept of stitch and bitch because she’d never heard it before. Then I threw out the idea of being called The Hackney Hooker, and it just stuck, there was no other name I could use after that, it still makes me laugh. 

What do you take into consideration when

selecting  your yarns?

Ultimately, it’s about what the product is being used for, how breathable it needs to be, how sturdy, how malleable etc, and that largely dictates my choices.


Like most things handmade, it’s tough when you try to be more mindful of the materials you use, as this often comes at a cost, and when people can buy a crochet dress on ASOS for £15 or less... it’s hard convincing people to spend that on raw materials alone.


What’s next in the pipeline? 

Project wise? So many things! I’m getting married in a couple of months which has absolutely inspired me to put together some playful bridal pieces.

I’m working to get stocked in a local shop which is mad and fab in equal measure.

In terms of dreaming big, I’d love to collaborate with some of my favourite brands or host some fun event in one of the many wine bars around this way. 

Tell us about the ALIGNE pieces you’re wearing and how you’ve styled them?

I like clothing items that are fuss free, so I chose pieces that I feel are chic, are easy, are versatile. Then I can inject some more playfulness with the accessories if I want.


There are some days I love getting ready, and others where I just need to thrown on a uniform without thinking. Incorporating pieces like these into my wardrobe means no matter how I wake up feeling, I’m able to feign a bit of effort.


Where do you go for outfit inspiration?

People on the street, social media also plays a part, consciously or unconsciously. 


What's your approach to curating a wardrobe? 

Slow and steady. I used to be way more impulsive, but I feel like it’s only now I’m in my late 20s that I actually get what I like in a way that lasts beyond a season.


I also love second hand/consignment shopping, so living East means I’m spoiled for choice.


How was Miyelle. Ceramics born?

I started creating with clay in 2017. I'm a graphic designer and art director, so I was looking for a creative outlet away from the computer screen. I thought I'd give making ceramics a by becoming a member of the studio Turning Earth. As soon as I touched the clay, I fell in love! I'm self-taught and simply learned by playing, asking studio members questions and watching YouTube tutorials. I have made lots of mistakes and tried out different making techniques and slowly with time my style has developed.

What do you take into consideration when designing your ceramics?

I’m drawn to both natural forms and abstract shapes and I enjoy experimenting with how these two ideas can combine. I also love bringing together opposites. Light and dark, rough and smooth, big and small; ying and yang to create harmony and balance. I always aim to create pieces that surprise, delight and make a space more beautiful. It’s also incredibly important for me to make in as sustainable a way as possible. Unfortunately, the firing process uses up a fair bit of energy but I try to offset that as best as I can by recycling my clay and using recycled and reused packaging. I think the fact that my pieces are handmade encourages people to keep these as forever items rather than throwaway purchases which is also very important to me.

Where do you go to seek inspiration?

I can get inspiration from anywhere: the shape of a leaf on a tree, a building in London, seeing exhibitions - the list is endless. I’ve just returned from an artist residency at Villa Lena in Tuscany and I was really inspired by the design features of the villa and the architecture in Siena and Florence. This influenced my latest capsule collection which will be launching soon.

What is the most important lesson you’ve learned in your career?

It’s so important to find something that you enjoy and excites you. I’ve had moments during my design career when I haven’t loved the work and that aspect of my life just feels pretty banal. But since I started making with clay I love spending most of my time making. It can be a time warp in my studio when I look up and the next thing I know, a few hours have passed.

How was Hackney Hooker born?

I was first taught how to make a granny square at a seniors coffee morning I volunteered at years ago, that’s the actual origin I suppose. But it was only in the last couple of years that I started making stuff for more than just immediate family and friends. TikTok coming along and making crochet popular again deffo played a part, and then it naturally evolved from there with people reaching out for bits I’d been sharing first on my personal insta and then on the Hackney Hooker one.

Where did the name come from? 

It was a joke, I had a craft club at my flat every Monday night - everyone brought their own thing, painting, crochet, knitting, sewing, very East London - and one of the girls was laughing at the concept of stitch and bitch because she’d never heard it before. Then I threw out the idea of being called The Hackney Hooker, and it just stuck, there was no other name I could use after that, it still makes me laugh. 

What do you take into consideration when

selecting  your yarns?

Ultimately, it’s about what the product is being used for, how breathable it needs to be, how sturdy, how malleable etc, and that largely dictates my choices.


Like most things handmade, it’s tough when you try to be more mindful of the materials you use, as this often comes at a cost, and when people can buy a crochet dress on ASOS for £15 or less... it’s hard convincing people to spend that on raw materials alone.


What’s next in the pipeline? 

Project wise? So many things! I’m getting married in a couple of months which has absolutely inspired me to put together some playful bridal pieces.

I’m working to get stocked in a local shop which is mad and fab in equal measure.

In terms of dreaming big, I’d love to collaborate with some of my favourite brands or host some fun event in one of the many wine bars around this way. 

Tell us about the ALIGNE pieces you’re wearing and how you’ve styled them?

I like clothing items that are fuss free, so I chose pieces that I feel are chic, are easy, are versatile. Then I can inject some more playfulness with the accessories if I want.


There are some days I love getting ready, and others where I just need to thrown on a uniform without thinking. Incorporating pieces like these into my wardrobe means no matter how I wake up feeling, I’m able to feign a bit of effort.


Where do you go for outfit inspiration?

People on the street, social media also plays a part, consciously or unconsciously. 


What's your approach to curating a wardrobe? 

Slow and steady. I used to be way more impulsive, but I feel like it’s only now I’m in my late 20s that I actually get what I like in a way that lasts beyond a season.


I also love second hand/consignment shopping, so living East means I’m spoiled for choice.


How was Miyelle. born?

I started creating with clay in 2017. I'm a graphic designer and art director, so I was looking for a creative outlet away from the computer screen. I thought I'd give making ceramics a by becoming a member of the studio Turning Earth. As soon as I touched the clay, I fell in love! I'm self-taught and simply learned by playing, asking studio members questions and watching YouTube tutorials. I have made lots of mistakes and tried out different making techniques and slowly with time my style has developed.

What do you take into consideration when designing your ceramics?

I’m drawn to both natural forms and abstract shapes and I enjoy experimenting with how these two ideas can combine. I also love bringing together opposites. Light and dark, rough and smooth, big and small; ying and yang to create harmony and balance. I always aim to create pieces that surprise, delight and make a space more beautiful. It’s also incredibly important for me to make in as sustainable a way as possible. Unfortunately, the firing process uses up a fair bit of energy but I try to offset that as best as I can by recycling my clay and using recycled and reused packaging. I think the fact that my pieces are handmade encourages people to keep these as forever items rather than throwaway purchases which is also very important to me.

What is the most important lesson you’ve learned in your career?

It’s so important to find something that you enjoy and excites you. I’ve had moments during my design career when I haven’t loved the work and that aspect of my life just feels pretty banal. But since I started making with clay I love spending most of my time making. It can be a time warp in my studio when I look up and the next thing I know, a few hours have passed.

What's your approach to curating a wardrobe?

A friend recently introduced me to discovering my colours so now when I look for a new piece or outfit I’ll start with which colours look good on me. I’m a 'deep winter palette' so I know that strong colours suit me. I try and buy from charity shops and vintage shops but if I’m buying a new piece then it’s important that something is as sustainable as possible, locally designed and well made. I’m trying to avoid fast fashion as best as I can. I’m petite so I also need clothes that flatter my short frame rather than drown me.  

Where do you go to seek inspiration?

I can get inspiration from anywhere: the shape of a leaf on a tree, a building in London, seeing exhibitions - the list is endless. I’ve just returned from an artist residency at Villa Lena in Tuscany and I was really inspired by the design features of the villa and the architecture in Siena and Florence. This influenced my latest capsule collection which will be launching soon.

Tell us about the ALIGNE pieces you’ve selected and how you’ve styled them? 

I'm wearing the Loretta Denim shirt with a pair of cropped black jeans. This shirt is great for the studio as it's loose, comfortable and so soft. The Jalen Patchwork dress is a real statement piece with its puffed sleeves and patchwork design. I'm wearing this with my Converse trainers for a playful daytime look. The Kendra Tailored Dress is so beautiful. It's way too chic to be worn in the studio but it's something I'd put on when I'm done for the day and ready to go out.



What's your approach to curating a wardrobe?

A friend recently introduced me to discovering my colours so now when I look for a new piece or outfit I’ll start with which colours look good on me. I’m a 'deep winter palette' so I know that strong colours suit me. I try and buy from charity shops and vintage shops but if I’m buying a new piece then it’s important that something is as sustainable as possible, locally designed and well made. I’m trying to avoid fast fashion as best as I can. I’m petite so I also need clothes that flatter my short frame rather than drown me.  

Tell us about the ALIGNE pieces you’ve selected and how you’ve styled them? 

I'm wearing the Loretta Denim shirt with a pair of cropped black jeans. This shirt is great for the studio as it's loose, comfortable and so soft. The Jalen Patchwork dress is a real statement piece with its puffed sleeves and patchwork design. I'm wearing this with my Converse trainers for a playful daytime look. The Kendra Tailored Dress is so beautiful. It's way too chic to be worn in the studio but it's something I'd put on when I'm done for the day and ready to go out.

MIYELLE'S PICKS

Sale Off
Jacinda Wide Leg Jeans
£99.00£69.99
Sale Off
Jacinda Wide Leg Jeans
£99.00£69.99
Sale Off
Kayley Pinstripe Pleated Trousers
£119.00£54.49
Sale Off
Jake Leather Mini Skirt
£129.00£49.99